Monthly Archives: July 2017

6-9 July 1553: King Edward VI Dies and Lady Jane Grey Becomes Queen

All Things Robert Dudley

Here’s a little excerpt (bar the footnotes) from my book
John Dudley: The Life of Lady Jane Grey’s Father-in-Law:

Edward VI died in the evening of 6 July 1553, in the arms of his
favourite courtiers Henry Sidney and Thomas Wroth. In his last
moments he told Sidney that he had “elected” the Lady Jane “not
out of spleen unto his sister for her religion, but out of pure love to
his subjects, that he desired they might live and die in the Lord, as
he did.” For the king’s treatment in his last weeks Northumberland
had called in the services of his own physician, as well as a female
quack and an Oxford professor.

Hours after Edward’s death Antoine de Noailles turned up at
court (having heard rumours that the king was no more) and
presented another missive from Henry II. The ambassador
promised the French king’s support…

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Joan Makepeace, Scotland’s Lonely Queen

History... the interesting bits!

Joan of the Tower, Queen of Scotland

In my research I frequently discover instances of happy medieval marriages – and even if a marriage was not based on love, it did not mean that it would not be successful. Indeed, in many such instances the young woman concerned found her own way of succeeding, whether it was through her children or the management of estates – or the fact that a lasting peace was achieved between her 2 countries.

Unfortunately for Joan of the Tower, later to be known as Joan Makepeace, her marriage achieved none of these things.

Joan was born in the Tower of London on 5 July, 1321; hence her rather dramatic name. She was the youngest of the 4 children of Edward II and his queen, Isabella of France, and had 2 older brothers and 1 sister. Her eldest brother, Edward, who was 9 years older…

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Elizabeth Blount, Royal Mistress

The Freelance History Writer

Source: http://www.fashion-era.com/hats-hair/hair3-1485-1600-womens-hair-calthrop.htm

Elizabeth Blount, also known as Bessie, was a member of the English gentry and has the distinction of being one of the known and documented mistresses of King Henry VIII. She also was the mother of the king’s son, the only illegitimate child that Henry recognized as his own.

Elizabeth was born c. 1500. She was the second daughter and one of eleven children, eight of whom survived. Her father was Sir John Blount of Kinlet Hall in Shropshire. Her mother was Katherine Peshall whose father had fought for King Henry VII at the Battle of Bosworth. Elizabeth would live her early years in Shropshire and she received a good education. She would grow up to be beautiful with a fair complexion, blue eyes and blond hair which was considered the epitome of Tudor beauty.

Elizabeth’s family was related to William Blount, 4th Lord Mountjoy, an important member…

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